10 reasons why you should and shouldn’t ask PDAers to do something

I am preempting today’s blog from an important message. The most important kind of all…from someone who knows. A true EXPERT. Next to PanKwake one whose opinion I value highly. This is good stuff, folks!

EXCELLENT blog from a PDA adult about how Pathological Demand Avoidance feels from the inside. These are the people we parents need to be listening to.

Not ‘experts’ for whom our #LittleHumans are nothing more than monkeys in cages to be studied so that they can advance their careers and become famous…write a book or get a huge grant. While there are a few good ones, don’t be fooled even those get caught up in the research SYSTEM.

#ActuallyAutistics and #ProudlyPDA like Riko Ryuki have the truth that we #parents need. Riko especially as she is a double expert: PDAer herself and #mother of #HappilyAutistic #LittleHumans.

Riko's blog: PDA and more.

There are many reasons behind asking someone to do something, often need and delegation of duties are main factors, but when it comes to asking someone who has unique difficulties and a difference of neurology, it can be difficult to figure out the pros and cons. Demand avoidance means no matter what you ask, it is going to be difficult, but that doesn’ mean we shouldn’t ever be asked for fear of triggering avoidance. So what are the pros and cons exactly? Well, I’ve laid out 10 of them to help you figure it out. I’ve kept the pros till last because I like to end on a positive.

5 reasons why you shouldn’t ask a PDAer to do something:

  1. Demand avoidance – asking a PDAer to do something, anything, will trigger demand avoidance. This leads to stress and anxiety amongst other things, and just generally makes our lives that…

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Published by Tara Cox

Writer of Literary Erotica Real-life, hot sex, deep meaning... In my day job, I am homemaker, home educator, urban farmer, and homesteader at our @HomeCrazzyHome.

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